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  • Global Studies Hero

    Global Studies (BA)

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    Admission Contact
    Office of Undergraduate Admission
    72 Fifth Ave.
    New York, NY 10011
    finish@newschool.edu
    212.229.5150 or 800.292.3040

    Program Contact
    Christina McElderry
    64 West 11th St., Room 120
    New York, NY 10011
    clmcelderry@newschool.edu
    646.909.2260

  • Earn a Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies in a program open to transfer students, adults, and other nontraditional undergraduates. Global Studies majors critically investigate complex global processes and issues, including migration and mobility, environmental injustice, economic inequality, and social movements. You learn to think across disciplines and contribute creative solutions - locally and globally - for bringing about a more equitable world.

    • Degree Bachelor of Arts
    • Credits 120 (up to 84 transfer credits)
    • Format Full-time or part-time, on campus (some classes available online)
    • Start Term Fall or Spring

    Innovative Curriculum

    Global Studies students critically examine power structures and analyze pressing issues, introducing them to contexts and causal dynamics that help them develop innovative responses to current issues. Students learn to think across disciplines and scales, understand our own implication in how things came to be, and pursue innovative responses to seemingly intractable problems.

    Learn more about the curriculum

    Interdisciplinary Excellence

    The New School offers the BA in Global Studies as part of the university's suite of cross-college, interdisciplinary undergraduate programs, which includes Global Studies, Environmental Studies, and Urban Studies. These interdisciplinary programs are designed to prepare students for the new careers of the 21st century.   

    Career Paths

    The program combines academic study with internships and other fieldwork opportunities in New York City and abroad. Graduates are prepared to pursue careers in the non-profit sector, public service, international organizations, global media, development, the arts, research organizations, education, government, and law, as well as graduate study in the social sciences, and more.

  • Global Studies students learn from and work with faculty who are scholars and practitioners from a variety of disciplines and professions around the world, including advocacy, community organizing, and international law.

  • Featured Courses

    • How might we think about gender beyond the Western canon? In this course, we take an interdisciplinary approach to questioning the dominance of Western gender theorizing by analyzing how and where it has been produced and then looking at how it has been marshaled, critiqued, changed, or ignored by movements and thinkers outside of the West. In staking out a departure from the canon, the class also questions the category of the West, tracing gender-based convergences and solidarities that blur the divide. In what ways is gender understood, theorized, resisted, and lived outside of the dominant institutions of knowledge production? Is the gender binary truly global? How can we think through and learn from nonbinary gender-based and feminist movements elsewhere? Topics covered include theories of “imperial feminism,” gender in critiques of colonialism, putting the binary in historical context, the relationship between performativity and work, and faith-based feminisms outside of Judeo-Christian traditions. We spend most of the course bringing academic texts into conversation with thinking outsideof  the academy. In addition to regular reading responses, the course includes a collaborative project. *A People, Places & Encounters (PPE) Cluster course.*

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    • In the contemporary world, food sparks debates on power structures, race, ethnicity, and multiculturalism that acquire particular relevance in places where people from around the world live together and interact. In this course, we examine food in relation to migration in New York City and at the national and international levels. We look at how food can become an instrument of communication and cultural exchange but also of exclusion and xenophobia. Through lectures, interviews, and fieldwork in the city, we use food as a starting point for an analysis of the dynamics of adaptation, appropriation, and diaspora in a global framework.

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    • How do states define their interests and responsibilities regarding migration flows, border controls, immigrant integration, and relationships with diasporas? How do the resulting migration policies affect the movement of people (or lack thereof) and migrants' political, economic, and civic engagement in countries of origin and destination? In Borders, Migrants, States, we examine policies of immigration and emigration from the perspective of the states where movement originates as well as the destinations (including countries of transit and return) and from the perspective of migrants who are affected by but also challenge and reshape such policies and norms. The course focuses on the United States and Latin America as the basis for discussions about the push and pull factors of migration, emphasizing labor migration and undocumented migration. We examine policies ranging from border controls to temporary worker programs, regularization programs (including DACA), immigrant integration, and diaspora policies focused on development in the origin country as well as the extension of citizenship rights across borders. In every case, we consider the impact of migration policies on migrants and their transnational activities, mobilization, and activism. The course includes site visits and guest speakers. In addition to academic texts, course materials include current news articles, documentary films, a novel, and chronicles.

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    • UGLB 3430

      Afrocentrism

      In this course, we investigate the epistemological foundations of development, the role of foreign intervention, and the foundational role of Africa in Western thought in order to consider pathways into more Afrocentrically focused ways of being. Africa is consistently represented as a region of "failed states" and corrupt dictators, a place in need of outside assistance as a result of so-called natural disasters such as drought and famine. From the days of the Arab trans-Saharan and European transatlantic slave trades to the period of European colonialism to the post-World War II era of "development," the relationship of Africa to the rest of the world has wavered between the twin pulls of exploitation and aid. Many scholars have asked whether foreign aid practices have actually done more harm than good on the continent. These scholars have been historicizing, politicizing, and destabilizing the seemingly stable discourse (and industry) of Western-style development. In this class, we draw on the work of scholars engaged in critical resistance to conventional development discourse to examine the impact of foreign intervention on contemporary economic, social, and political realities in Africa. We go on to explore the central role of Africa in Western historical and philosophical thought and various African sociopolitical visions of the future, looking specifically at indigenous knowledge systems as potential entry points into Afrocentric alternatives to development. Students develop the ability to critically assess the historical effects of international intervention on the continent, asking what kinds of social realities are made possible and what kinds are foreclosed as a result of these practices.

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    • In this interdisciplinary course, we critically examine the politics of violence as it relates to Indigenous lands and bodies. Students develop an understanding of the range, scope, and tactics of colonial violence and power, both past and present, and systematically explore the way Indigenous lands and bodies have been recast as terra nullius , as disposable wastelands, and as criminal through the enactment and expansion of settler laws and social policies. We also examine the relationships of Indigenous peoples to their territories, settler colonialism and its enduring effects on possibilities for everyday resurgence, gender violence and the murder and disappearance of Indigenous women and girls, extractive industries that seek to remove resources from the land and children from their families and communities, and the ongoing criminalization of Indigenous assertions of sovereignty and resistance to the state.

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    • In this interdisciplinary course, we critically examine the politics of violence as it relates to Indigenous lands and bodies. Students develop an understanding of the range, scope, and tactics of colonial violence and power, both in the past and today, and systematically explore how Indigenous lands and bodies have been recast as terra nullius, as disposable wastelands, and as criminal through the enactment and expansion of settler laws and social policies. We also examine the relationships of Indigenous peoples to their territories, settler colonialism and its enduring effects on possibilities for everyday resurgence, gender violence and the murder and disappearance of Indigenous women and girls, extractive industries that seek to remove resources from the land and children from their families and communities, and the ongoing criminalization of Indigenous assertions of sovereignty and resistance to the state. The syllabus emphasizes critical engagement with the work of Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars theorizing settler colonialism, Indigenous lived experience, and resistance to state violence.

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  • In Global Studies we work to connect analyses of global hegemony with the study of colonialism and white supremacy. Doing this requires us to rethink what we know and the structures and hierarchies in which we operate. We are continuously working through these issues to improve our curriculum, events, communication, initiatives, and community building, and create better spaces for our students.

    Alexandra Délano Alonso, Chair and Associate Professor of Global Studies
  • Take The Next Step

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Undergraduates

To apply to any of our undergraduate programs (except the Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students and Parsons Associate of Applied Science programs) complete and submit the Common App online.

Undergraduate Adult Learners

To apply to any of our Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students and Parsons Associate of Applied Science programs, complete and submit the New School Online Application.

Graduates

To apply to any of our Master's, Doctoral, Professional Studies Diploma, and Graduate Certificate programs, complete and submit the New School Online Application.

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